Dynamic Bicycles Runabout 8 chainless bike photos

Before we continue with our series on the chainless bikes from Dynamic Bicycles (see part 1 and part 2), we thought it might be appropriate to share some photos of the Runabout 8 (both 18″ standard frame, and some of the 16″ Easy Step frame).

The front reflector is rather cheap, and is actually too small to fit around the handlebar near the center. Instead, it sits off-center and tilted.
The front reflector is rather cheap, and is actually too small to fit around the handlebar near the center. Instead, it sits off-center and tilted.
The Runabout 8 (standard frame) with optional rear cargo rack and a 3rd party smartphone mount.
The Runabout 8 (standard frame) with optional rear cargo rack and a 3rd party smartphone mount.
Instead of a chain, the Dynamic Bicycles use a Sussex internal shaft drive.
Instead of a chain, the Dynamic Bicycles use a Sussex internal shaft drive.
The front and rear brakes are normal.
The front and rear brakes are normal.
Shimano Nexus Premium SG-R36 internal gear hub (8-speed).
Shimano Nexus Premium SG-R36 internal gear hub (8-speed).
The rear reflector attaches to the adjustable seat post.
The rear reflector attaches to the adjustable seat post.
The seat has a shock, and is adjustable without tools.
The seat has a shock, and is adjustable without tools.
Top view of the seat.
Top view of the seat.
Shimano twist shifter (8-speed).
Shimano twist shifter (8-speed).
Front view of the bike (with 3rd part smartphone mount attached). Notice the off-center, tilted reflector.
Front view of the bike (with 3rd part smartphone mount attached). Notice the off-center, tilted reflector.
Another view of the standard front brakes, and shocks.
Another view of the standard front brakes, and shocks.
Another view of the rear hub.
Another view of the rear hub.
The kickstand is rather wobbly. It is adjustable, and we had to adjust both of ours to keep the bike from falling over.
The kickstand is rather wobbly. It is adjustable, and we had to adjust both of ours to keep the bike from falling over.
Basic pedals (no cage).
Basic pedals (no cage).
Rear brakes.
Rear brakes.
The standard frame can mount two bottle cages.
The standard frame can mount two bottle cages.
The Easy Step frame can mount one bottle cage.
The Easy Step frame can mount one bottle cage.
Easy Step model with optional rear cargo rack, and 3rd party bottle cage and bottle attached.
Easy Step model with optional rear cargo rack, and 3rd party bottle cage and bottle attached.
Standard frame with optional rear cargo rack.
Standard frame with optional rear cargo rack.
Standard 18" frame (left) and Easy Step 16" frame (right).
Standard 18″ frame (left) and Easy Step 16″ frame (right).
Adjustable handlebar post.
Adjustable handlebar post.
View of optional rear cargo rack.
View of optional rear cargo rack.
Rear brakes and adjustable seat post.
Rear brakes and adjustable seat post.
Front view.
Front view.
Pedals.
Pedals.
Another side view.
Another side view.
Handlebar angle adjustment.
Handlebar angle adjustment.
We are not sure what this weird clip was for, but it was attached to one of the front cables.
We are not sure what this weird clip was for, but it was attached to one of the front cables.
One of our test bikes had the left (front) brake spaced away from the grip, so the finger position was the same as the right (rear) grip that had extra space taken up by the Twist Shifter.
One of our test bikes had the left (front) brake spaced away from the grip, so the finger position was the same as the right (rear) grip that had extra space taken up by the Twist Shifter.
Our other test bike has the left (front) brake flush against the grip, so finger positions on front and rear brakes were slightly different.
Our other test bike has the left (front) brake flush against the grip, so finger positions on front and rear brakes were slightly different.
The rear frame where the cargo rack mounts also has a few drilled holes that appear to be for some other accessory.
The rear frame where the cargo rack mounts also has a few drilled holes that appear to be for some other accessory.
After two rides, the logo text on the seat was rubbing off from one of our two test bikes.
After two rides, the logo text on the seat was rubbing off from one of our two test bikes.
The 1998 Trek seat (same rider) has yet to rub off. Perhaps the seats are different enough to cause extra friction?
The 1998 Trek seat (same rider) has yet to rub off. Perhaps the seats are different enough to cause extra friction?

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